March 2020 - Brain Injury Awareness Tools

Disability Resource Library Newsletter

TBI

This month's Disability Resource Library newsletter focuses on Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) resources. These are just a few of the many resources and information available for individuals with TBIs, their families, and others dedicated to increasing awareness and advocating for TBI research.

Take a look at a few of the resources our Disability Resource Library has to offer and, as always, please feel free to reach out to Roger May, the Media Resource Specialist for the Center for Excellence in Disabilities, via email at roger.may@hsc.wvu.edu or by phone at 304-205-6434.

Featured Resources

All featured resources are available to borrow from the DRL
Browse more resources.

TBI - To Be Injured

By Carol Gieg

cover of TBI - To Be Injured

Carol Gieg, a licensed clinical social worker, has always thrived on helping other people solve problems. But one day—unknown to her—she’d soon be facing serious problems of her own. After dropping her husband off at work, she went on a bike ride. As someone who enjoyed hiking and staying active, it was a routine day. Somehow, she suffered an accident as well as seizures. By the time she arrived at the hospital, her brain was bleeding, and it was unclear if she’d survive. Many others could tell similar stories.

Those lucky enough to survive a brain injury face many challenges—some more so than others. Whether you’re coping with an injury yourself or have a loved one seeking to discover a new normal, you’ll be informed and inspired by this story of surviving and thriving after a brain injury.

Borrow TBI - To Be Injured from our library.

Lost & Found: A Survivor's Guide for Reconstructing Life After Brain Injury

By Barbara J. Webster

Coping with life after brain injury is not easy. This practical and user friendly workbook and guide for survivors and their families is packed with everyday strategies, tips and accommodations to address the cognitive challenges of daily life. Based on the author's experience as a survivor and as a facilitator of hundreds of support groups, she presents a philosophy and approach for overcoming challenges, envisioning goals, and continuing their healing process. This is the one book that every survivor of a brain injury and the family should have. It is the most comprehensive, sensitive, insightful and thorough workbook available and is filled with hands on practical strategies aimed at helping the person with a brain injury navigate the complexities of daily life.

Borrow Lost & Found: A Survivor's Guide for Reconstructing Life After Brain Injury from our library.

Over My Head: A Doctor's Own Story of Head Injury from the Inside Looking Out

By Claudia L. Osborn

cover of Over My Head

Locked inside a brain-injured head looking out at a challenging world is the premise of this extraordinary autobiography. Over My Head is an inspiring story of how one woman comes to terms with the loss of her identity and the courageous steps (and hilarious missteps) she takes while learning to rebuild her life. The author, a 45-year-old doctor and clinical professor of medicine, describes the aftermath of a brain injury eleven years ago which stripped her of her beloved profession. For years she was deprived of her intellectual companionship and the ability to handle the simplest undertakings like shopping for groceries or sorting the mail. Her progression from confusion, dysfunction, and alienation to a full, happy life is told with restraint, great style, and considerable humor.

Borrow Over My Head: A Doctor's Own Story of Head Injury from the Inside Looking Out from our library.

Successfully Surviving a Brain Injury: A Family Guidebook

By Garry Prowe

Someone you love has suffered a brain injury. The doctors can not yet make a prognosis. Every brain injury is unique and unpredictable, they say. You have been told to hope for the best, but prepare for the worst. What do you do now? Successfully Surviving a Brain Injury is an easy-to-read guidebook for families suddenly thrust into the painful and confusing world of brain injury. This book is not only a practical and essential roadmap to a successful recovery, it also is an inspirational story of how one couple overcame profound changes in their relationship and created a fulfilling new life.

Borrow Successfully Surviving a Brain Injury: A Family Guidebook from our library.

Successfully Surviving a Brain Injury: A Family Guidebook

By Garry Prowe

Someone you love has suffered a brain injury. The doctors can not yet make a prognosis. Every brain injury is unique and unpredictable, they say. You have been told to hope for the best, but prepare for the worst. What do you do now? Successfully Surviving a Brain Injury is an easy-to-read guidebook for families suddenly thrust into the painful and confusing world of brain injury. This book is not only a practical and essential roadmap to a successful recovery, it also is an inspirational story of how one couple overcame profound changes in their relationship and created a fulfilling new life.

Borrow Successfully Surviving a Brain Injury: A Family Guidebook from our library.

Pediatric Orthopaedics and Sports Injuries: A Quick Reference Guide

By John F. Sarwark, MD and Cynthia R. LaBella, MD

The new 2nd edition of this popular resource delivers targeted guidance on the diagnosis, treatment and management of orthopaedic problems and sports injuries. Covering 74 chapters, the book offers an overview approach and includes differential diagnosis and work-up of patients with orthopaedic injuries and bone and joint conditions. Plus, step-by-step help with musculoskeletal examination and evaluation; casting and splinting; imaging techniques, and rehabilitation strategies. The book features many full color illustrations, clinical photographs and radiographic images to demonstrate physical examination techniques and pathologic physical findings, as well as tables and figures to aid in diagnosis.

Borrow Pediatric Orthopaedics and Sports Injuries from our library.

In Harm's Way and Coming Home (DVDs)

dvd cover of In Harms Way

In Harm's Way - Young children, ages 0-4 are especially vulnerable to Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs) that arise from falls, accidents, and Non-Accidental Head Trauma. Too often, children with unidentified TBIs are labeled with behavioral problems or mental deficiencies that impact the remainder of their lives. Run time: 39 minutes.

Coming Home focuses on the ways that traumatic brain injury has changed the lives of veterans and their families. In the video, three New York veterans and their families share their perspectives on the challenges they face as they navigate the world of brain injury. Run time: 27 minutes.

Borrow In Harm's Way: Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Children or Coming Home: Families, Courage, and Resilience after Brain Injury from our library.

Navigation Tips - CDC Brain Injury Reduction

There are many ways to reduce the chances of sustaining a traumatic brain injury. Try some of these steps:

  • Buckle up every ride. Wear a seatbelt every time you drive or ride in a motor vehicle.
  • Never drive while under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
  • Wear a helmet or appropriate headgear when riding a bike, playing a contact sport, or participating in other contact-related activities.
  • Prevent older adult falls. Check with your doctor about medicines that may cause drowsiness. Have your eyes checked at least once a year.
  • Make living and play areas safer for children. Install window guards, use safety glasses, and be sure your child's playground has soft material around it such as mulch or sand.

These techniques can help reduce the likelihood of a brain injury. Information on how to effectively build these skills can be found in our Disability Resource Library or at the CDC's website.

A Child's Champion

This month's Child's Champion is Sara Hitchings-Bintrim, pictured here with her brother, Paul. Sara has 15 years of experience with Traumatic Brain Injury. In those 15 years, she has become an advocate and leader in her TBI community. Since 2012, she has served in significant roles in the Martinsburg, West Virginia support group and in 2018, began a lead role in the group.

Sara's passion for those in her community is inspirational to those around her. "My passion for TBI is knowing that I can be the helping hand my family did not have when we began our journey. TBI affects the whole family, not just the survivor," she said. "I enjoy the feeling of being able to help families and survivors find their new normal. Sometime with TBI you must think outside of the box or find alternative methods and I continually work to find new ways/information that may help people," Sara added.

"The best reward is knowing that I am a phone call away for TBI folks looking for a guiding hand into a world of unknowns," Sara said. Please join us in celebrating Sara as our March Child's Champion!

Do you know someone you'd like to nominate to be featured as a Child's Champion in our monthly newsletter? Please let us know! Contact Roger May, the Media Resource Specialist for the Center for Excellence in Disabilities, via email at roger.may@hsc.wvu.edu or by phone at 304-205-6434.